The case for the Africa50 fund

Report

This report was produced by De Charles in collaboration with Made in Africa Foundation to further highlight the state of Africa’s infrastructure, in particular power, transportation, and water.

This report was produced by De Charles in collaboration with Made in Africa Foundation to further highlight the state of Africa’s infrastructure, in particular power, transportation, and water.

Africa lacks access to power infrastructure. However, as shown in this report, a far larger percentage of the continent exists in partial darkness since insufficient capacity – amongst other issues – mean many Africans experience a sporadic electricity supply. The continent’s poor transport network makes trans-African travel difficult and increases the financial and temporal cost of business; additionally, transport has significant effects on the rural poor increasing their price of kerosene by up to 170% when compared to urban areas.

With its glut of natural resources and the inventiveness of its people, Africa defied odds derived from its derelict infrastructure, and in the last decade grew at a rate second only to emerging Asia. Therefore, as investment vehicles such as the Africa 50 fund aimed at ameliorating Africa’s structural issues increase, it would be sensible to assume that Africa’s growth will develop in its diversity and robustness. For the world, this would no doubt provide a new economic power, and, for the continent itself, a new level of confidence and vibrancy that it has not broadly experienced for over a hundred years.

Africa lacks access to power infrastructure. However, as shown in this report, a far larger percentage of the continent exists in partial darkness since insufficient capacity – amongst other issues – mean many Africans experience a sporadic electricity supply. The continent’s poor transport network makes trans-African travel difficult and increases the financial and temporal cost of business; additionally, transport has significant effects on the rural poor increasing their price of kerosene by up to 170% when compared to urban areas.

With its glut of natural resources and the inventiveness of its people, Africa defied odds derived from its derelict infrastructure, and in the last decade grew at a rate second only to emerging Asia. Therefore, as investment vehicles such as the Africa 50 fund aimed at ameliorating Africa’s structural issues increase, it would be sensible to assume that Africa’s growth will develop in its diversity and robustness. For the world, this would no doubt provide a new economic power, and, for the continent itself, a new level of confidence and vibrancy that it has not broadly experienced for over a hundred years.

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